• Couverture WHAT DOES GREATER ECONOMIC INTEGRATION MEAN FOR INTERREGIONAL INCOME INEQUALITY? AN ANALYSIS OF OECD COUNTRIES AND REGIONS
  • 4eme WHAT DOES GREATER ECONOMIC INTEGRATION MEAN FOR INTERREGIONAL INCOME INEQUALITY? AN ANALYSIS OF OECD COUNTRIES AND REGIONS

WHAT DOES GREATER ECONOMIC INTEGRATION MEAN FOR INTERREGIONAL INCOME INEQUALITY? AN ANALYSIS OF OECD COUNTRIES AND REGIONS

revue d'origine de cet article : Région et Développement 33

Date de publication : mai 2011
Version numérique* :
3 €
* Nos versions numériques sont compatibles avec l'ensemble des liseuses et lecteurs du marché.

Abstract - This paper provides an overview of the evolution of interregional
income disparities among 304 regions from 27 OECD countries between 1995
and 2005. This sample of regions allows to compare interregional income
inequality in different economic integration systems: the USA (used as an
example of a political union), the European Economic and Monetary Union
(EMU), the European Union (EU), and the North-American Free Trade
Agreement (NAFTA). Overall, interregional income inequality is lower among
US states and EMU regions than among EU regions and NAFTA regions. Thus,
interregional income inequality seems to be negatively related to economic
integration. However, income inequality has risen among US states, while it has
been stable among OECD regions, and has even decreased among European
regions. Moreover, rank-size scatterplots suggest that inequality is higher
among low-income regions than among richer regions

     
  • ISBN : 978-2-296-55184-8 • mai 2011 • 20 pages
  • Télécharger les fichiers de couverture : rectoversoaplat